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NMM 10525. Keyed Trumpet by Eduard Johann Bauer, Prague, late 1830s
Joe R. and Joella F. Utley Collection, 2003

NMM 10525. Keyed trumpet by Eduard Johann Bauer, Prague, late 1830s. Joe R. and Joella F. Utley Foundation, 2004.
Bauer's signature on NMM 10525. Keyed trumpet by Eduard Johann Bauer, Prague, late 1830s. Joe R. and Joella F. Utley Collection, 1999.

Stamped on garland: K K befugte Instr: Fabrik [double eagle] des Ed. Joh. Bauer in Prag.

Two-piece (main tubing, bell), double-loop brass body; brass garland with impressed floral dot pattern. Overlapping tab seam leaning towards the inside of the bell (width of tabs ca. 2 mm at a distance of ca. 2 mm). Bohemian rim with diagonally impressed hatching. Brass ferrules with engraved and impressed lines. Flat round key heads with white leather pads; brass tone-hole rims soldered to body (no. 2 original with four engraved lines; the rest replacements); keys pivot in rectangular brass saddles; leaf spring.

Five closed keys for the left hand, beginning with the one nearest the bell, provide the following notes: 1) g-sharp (little finger); 2) a (ring finger); 3) b-flat (index finger); 4) b-natural (index finger); and, 5) f2 (middle finger).

Accessories: Brass mouthpiece with very deep cup (ca. 20 mm).

Sounding length: 1516 mm; internal diameter receiver: 11.6 mm, internal diameter minimum (at 47 mm): 10.4 mm; bell diameter: 128 mm.


NMM 10525. Keyed trumpet by Eduard Johann Bauer, Prague, late 1830s.  Joe R. and Joella F. Utley Collection, 2003.

Bauer's instrument is a relatively late example of an Austrian-type keyed trumpet, originally developed by Anton Weidinger (1766-1852), the Viennese trumpet virtuoso for whom Haydn wrote his trumpet concerto in E-flat (1796). Held horizontally, the trumpet'sfive keys are operated with the left hand. Eduard Johann Bauer (ca. 1811-1871) received his license as a brass instrument maker in 1836 and subsequently took over his father's workshop. In 1844 Bauer received a patent for a piston valve, so it can be assumed that the Museum's keyed trumpet was built before then, but it is likely to have been made before 1840, when the keyed trumpet was being superseded by the valve trumpet. Bauer's instrument might have been used in a military band, considering its relatively high pitch of a1 = 449 Hz, which can be interpreted as high Austrian military pitch.

The trumpet's five closed keys have flat round heads and pivot in rectangular brass saddles with leaf springs. According to contemporary tutors, the keys, beginning with the one nearest the bell, serve the following notes: 1) g-sharp (little finger); 2) a (ring finger); 3) b-flat (index finger); 4) b-natural (index finger); and, 5) f2 (middle finger).


Signature Engraved on Bell Garland

First half of signature on NMM 10525. Keyed trumpet by Eduard Johann Bauer, Prague, late 1830s.  Joe R. and Joella F. Utley Collection, 1999.

First half of signature stamp: K K befugte Instr: Fabrik [double eagle]. Translation: Royal imperial privileged instrument factory. The bell garland ends in a typical Bohemian bell rim, which is hollow with impressed diagonal hatching, rather than having a wire insert.

Second half of signature on NMM 10525. Keyed trumpet by Eduard Johann Bauer, Prague, late 1830s.  Joe R. and Joella F. Utley Collection, 1999.

Second half of signature stamp: [double eagle] des Ed. Joh. Bauer in Prag. Translation: of Eduard Johann Bauer in Prague.



Lit.:  Sabine Klaus, "The Utley Collection  .  .  . New Jewels Include a Rare Keyed Trumpet by E. J. Bauer, Prague," National Music Museum Newsletter, Vol. 31, No. 1 (February 2004), pp. 1-2.


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